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Clarifying Gibby's Retaliation Philosophy, Just As Suspected

When Mark Reynolds got beaned by the Washington Nationals, there was talk of why old-school Kirk Gibson didn't instruct a pitcher to retaliate (also, why Reynolds played the next game). Turns out the D-backs just weren't listening to the non-verbal communication or verbal storytelling.

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From Nick Piecoro at AZcentral.com

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"But somewhere down the line, if someone would have responded in that series, to me that's one of the things that helps (bring a team together)," Gibson said.

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When asked whether he thought a pitcher should have responded against the Nationals - whom the Diamondbacks play again this weekend - Gibson answered with an anecdote.

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He recalled a game from his year in Kansas City when the opposing team threw behind teammate George Brett's head in the ninth inning.

↵"Our pitcher didn't hit them," Gibson said. "When we went into the clubhouse, I tore that place up, and I called every one of them out. I did that as a player - I'm not going to do that as a manager.
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So, to recap, the D-backs should know better. Quick, schedule a review of Historical Baseball Implicit Traditions and Unspoken Practices. Or maybe no one loves Mark Reynolds like Kirk Gibson loved George Brett.

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